Good Quote 10-18-17

“The American Revolution represented the informed and mature convictions of a great mass of independent, liberty loving, God-fearing who knew their rights, and possessed the courage to dare to maintain them…

The Continental Congress was not only composed of great men, but it represented a great people.  While its Members did not fail to exercise a remarkable leadership, they were equally observant of their representative capacity.  They were industrious in encouraging their constituents to instruct them to support independence.  But until such instructions were given they were inclined to withhold action…

A spring will cease to flow if its source be dried up; a tree will wither if its roots be destroyed.  In its main features the Declaration of Independence is a great spiritual document.  It is a declaration not of material but of spiritual document.  It is a declaration not of material but of spiritual conceptions.  Equality, liberty, popular sovereignty, the rights of man-these are not elements which we can see and touch.  They are ideals.  They have their source and their roots in the religious convictions.  They belong to the unseen world.  Unless the faith of the American people in these religious convictions is to endure, the principles of our Declaration will perish.  We cannot continue to enjoy the result if we neglect and abandon the cause.

We are too prone to overlook another conclusion.  Governments do not make ideals, but ideals make governments.  This is both historically and logically true.  Of course the government can help to sustain ideals and can create institutions through which they can be the better observed, but their source by their very nature is in the people.  The people have to bear their own responsibilities.  There is no method by which that burden can be shifted to the government.  It is not the enactment, but the observance of laws, that creates the character of a nation.

About the Declaration there is a finality that is exceedingly restful.  It is often asserted that the world has made a great deal of progress since 1776, that we have had new thoughts and new experiences which have given us a great advance over the people of that day, and that we may very well discard their conclusions for something more modern.  But that reasoning cannot be applied to this great charter.  If all men are created equal, that is final.  If governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed, that is final.  No advance, no progress can be made beyond these propositions.  If anyone wishes to deny their truth or their soundness, the only direction in which he can proceed historically is not forward, but backward toward the time when there was no equality, no rights of the individual, no rule of the people.  Those who wish to proceed in that direction cannot lay claim to progress. They are reactionary.  Their ideas are not more modern, but more ancient, then those of the Revolutionary fathers…”

Calvin Coolidge, quoted by Mark Levin in Rediscovering Americanism

About Cindy Bleuler Tucker

Hi! I'm Cindy, and I am a retired teacher, wife, and mother of a 20 year old. I am a Christian with great interest in living for the Lord in my daily life. My Christian worldview permeates every thing I do and say, at least when my sin doesn't get in the way! My family and friends are very important to me. I have a great interest in the Blble, moral issues, politics, books music, and popular culture. I love writing, going to church activities, swimming, and exercising. I have a personal interest in disability and adoption issues. I write devotionals, political commentary, reviews, poetry, and some fiction and I guess whatever I feel like. I guarantee you will not agree with me on everything. I welcome your constructive comments and hope we can have a great sharing of the minds.
This entry was posted in Calvin Coolidge, History, Political, Politics, Quotes and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *